ashabenford_map.jpg
Ashabenford
Ruler Heresk Malorn
Government Council
Religions Chauntea
Tyr
Population 2000
Races
Imports Oil, Ore, Textile
Exports Ale, Grain, Vegetables
Inhabited Yes
Organizations Riders of Mistledale

Ashabenford

The capital of Mistledale is a pleasant, informal cluster of homes, rustic cottages, and trees located primarily on the east bank of the Ashaba. Most of the services a traveler might need are found along the Moonsea Ride, but one will search Ashabenford in vain for a large open market. Farmers coming here stop their carts in the yards and drive lanes of friends or those they have hired space from and sell produce directly from the tailboards. A merchant in search of a wagonload of something may well have to tour the back streets of Ashabenford - not that this is an unpleasant prospect.

Ashabenford is one of those places where folk too old or tired to do more gardening or farmwork for the time being go out for a stroll to chat or sit on their covered porches and hail passersby, They are open and friendly, and the wayfarer who does not appear too nosy can learn all about whatever news has come to Ashabenford in fairly short order. The smell of fresh manure may be strong here from time to time, but Ashabenford is a town that is easy on the eye – if not quite so easy on the purse. The inns here charge prices akin to Cormyr and Sembia, not the bargains found in the more rustic Dales.

The Velvet Veil

This cheerfully rowdy dance hall long ago took over the task of slaking thirsts from the Ashabenford Arms (which is now an upper-scale inn) and goes at it in fine spirit. Folk often stop over in town for an extra night so as to spend most of a day in here dancing, watching others dance, drinking, and floors of bedchambers where the dancers talking with other guests. Others come here because the Velvet or when those who work as escorts bring Veil's features exotic dancers. Veils fly in all directions during performances, and female guests sometimes leave in scandalized disgust - unless they discover the room around the back where male dancers prance and preen in front of hollering, whistling, women!

The Ashabenford Arms

If the recently opened White Hart is Ashabenford's fun, informal inn, the Arms is its time-honored house of quality. The all-inclusive price buys the best service in the Dales and just about anywhere else. Many merchants divert from faster overland routes to stay at the Arms and be pampered for a few days. The staff members even remember what drinks regulars like and have them ready.

The White Hart

The White Hart's fee buys a guest his stabling and horse care, a luxuriously furnished room, and all the tales of adventure one cares to hear. This inn is run by a former adventurer, the warrior Holfast Harpenshield, and caters to adventurers who seem to lounge about the place playing soft music, chatting, and sharpening their blades at all hours. It has good, simple, hearty food, lots to drink, and good folk to share it all with. Most folk who love the spice of danger and far travel will love it, too.

Temple of Tyr

Raised only in 1370 DR, this impressive temple marks Ashabenford as a more important community that the traveller might expect. The High Priest distrusts adventurers, though will supply the needy with temple services. He spends the remainder of his time and effort aiding the Riders in defending the town.

  • geography/ashabenford.txt
  • Last modified: 2018/01/13 06:47
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